When did the first recycling plants appear in the United States?

2

Answers


  1. 0 Votes

    Recycling started on a large scale during the Second World War, when 20,000 salvage committees and 400,000 volunteers salvaged tin, rubber, aluminum and other scraps—even doorknobs and girdles—to help the military.  The metal straps in corsets reportedly saved enoughed metal to build two warships.

    This practice of recycling did not turn into a culture at that time, though; on the contrary, the country only increased its wasteful tendencies with more disposable products and the growth of frozen and canned food industries.

    It wasn’t until 1970, with the first National Earth Day, that recycling came to the forefront.  Programs in schools, religious and environmental organizations, and youth groups all participated.  The EPA was created and the Resource Recovery Act was created to focus concentration on recycling.

    In that same year, Woodbury, New Jersey became the first city to mandate recycling.  In 1986, California enacted the California Beverage Container Recycling and Litter Reduction Act and Rhode Island passed a mandatory recycling law for aluminum, tin, glass, plastic bottles and newspapers.

    The United States started recycling long before it believed in it for environmental (and financially smart) reasons, and it wasn’t until the 1970s and 80s that recycling plants and city- and state-wide recycling began to come into play.

  2. 0 Votes

    Version:1.0 StartHTML:0000000188 EndHTML:0000008356 StartFragment:0000002417 EndFragment:0000008320 SourceURL:file://localhost/Walking%20and%20Biking%20Tours/Tour%20Stop%20Reduction @font-face { font-family: “Times New Roman”; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: “Times New Roman”; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; font-family: “Times New Roman”; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }

     

                About two and one-half miles south of West Newton, Pennsylvania, on the east bank of the Youghiogheny, there exists a small red brick structure with a pipe and two openings protruding from its base.  They are part of the remains of the Reduction Recycling Plant, which operated along the banks of the Youghiogheny from 1910 to 1936.  The village of Reduction was established in 1898 and originally named Flinn in honor of Senator William Flinn. 

     

                It was renamed “Reduction” in 1907 when the American Reduction Garbage Company purchased 106 acres in and around village to build a plant to recycle garbage from the city of Pittsburgh.  The company operated a collection center for garbage on 22nd Street in Pittsburgh.  Once the garbage was incinerated in Pittsburgh, it was loaded into special cars and transported to Reduction.  The plant only received garbage from Pittsburgh, even excluding local garbage.

     

    The plant, operated 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and employed more than 100 workers who worked initially worked 12 hour shifts.  The plant, at some point, changed to three eight-hour shifts.  All the buildings and homes in Reduction were owned by the company, yet there was no company store.  Residents shopped in Smithton and West Newton.  The average pay was 40 dollar per week, and the all-male work fore had a minimum age of 16.  Most of the workers were of Polish and Czechoslovakian.  Some lived in the 28 company homes within the village, and some workers lived in West Newton and Gratztown.  At its close, Reduction had approximately 400 residents.

     

    The plant produced tankage and grease.  Tankage is a degreased garbage which contains two and one-half to three percent ammonia, the equivalent of nitrogen.  Mixed with acid phosphoric and potash it makes fertilizer.  The other product, “brown grease”, was used to make red oil, a soap base, for fluffing wool.  Between 30 and 35  cars of tankage and 350,000 pounds of grease were produced monthly. The “brown grease” was sold to Proctor and Gamble, and shipped by rail to facilities in Cincinnati, Ohio.

     

    The process worked as follows:

    •The plant was operated on coal.  Horses were used to haul cars of coal from local mines to the boiler.  A pump station from the Youghiogheny River supplied the boilers and other water needs of the plant.

    •The garbage was sorted on a conveyor belt.  Tin, glass and other recyclable items were separated from the trash to be burned.  The garbage was then placed into tanks and cooked.  Next the garbage was sent to dryers. 

    •After drying, the was “ground.”  After grinding, it went to the Naphtha plant to extract the grease.  The grease was shipped to Proctor and Gamble to make soap and other products.  The remaining material was ground again and placed into sacks to be sold as fertilizer.  The fertilizer that could not be sold was given to local farmers. 

     

                The plant operated from 1910 to 1936.  It closed April 1st of that year, when a similar operation was opened in Pittsburgh.  An article written in the 1920’s about Reduction listed the annual volume of business at more than $ 300,000 (a 58 million dollar industry in today’s economy, according to the CPI Index).

    Version:1.0 StartHTML:0000000188 EndHTML:0000008356 StartFragment:0000002417 EndFragment:0000008320 SourceURL:file://localhost/Walking%20and%20Biking%20Tours/Tour%20Stop%20Reduction @font-face { font-family: “Times New Roman”; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: “Times New Roman”; }table.MsoNormalTable { font-size: 10pt; font-family: “Times New Roman”; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; }

     

                About two and one-half miles south of West Newton, Pennsylvania, on the east bank of the Youghiogheny, there exists a small red brick structure with a pipe and two openings protruding from its base.  They are part of the remains of the Reduction Recycling Plant, which operated along the banks of the Youghiogheny from 1910 to 1936.  The village of Reduction was established in 1898 and originally named Flinn in honor of Senator William Flinn. 

     

                It was renamed “Reduction” in 1907 when the American Reduction Garbage Company purchased 106 acres in and around village to build a plant to recycle garbage from the city of Pittsburgh.  The company operated a collection center for garbage on 22nd Street in Pittsburgh.  Once the garbage was incinerated in Pittsburgh, it was loaded into special cars and transported to Reduction.  The plant only received garbage from Pittsburgh, even excluding local garbage.

     

    The plant, operated 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and employed more than 100 workers who worked initially worked 12 hour shifts.  The plant, at some point, changed to three eight-hour shifts.  All the buildings and homes in Reduction were owned by the company, yet there was no company store.  Residents shopped in Smithton and West Newton.  The average pay was 40 dollar per week, and the all-male work fore had a minimum age of 16.  Most of the workers were of Polish and Czechoslovakian.  Some lived in the 28 company homes within the village, and some workers lived in West Newton and Gratztown.  At its close, Reduction had approximately 400 residents.

     

    The plant produced tankage and grease.  Tankage is a degreased garbage which contains two and one-half to three percent ammonia, the equivalent of nitrogen.  Mixed with acid phosphoric and potash it makes fertilizer.  The other product, “brown grease”, was used to make red oil, a soap base, for fluffing wool.  Between 30 and 35  cars of tankage and 350,000 pounds of grease were produced monthly. The “brown grease” was sold to Proctor and Gamble, and shipped by rail to facilities in Cincinnati, Ohio.

     

    The process worked as follows:

    •The plant was operated on coal.  Horses were used to haul cars of coal from local mines to the boiler.  A pump station from the Youghiogheny River supplied the boilers and other water needs of the plant.

    •The garbage was sorted on a conveyor belt.  Tin, glass and other recyclable items were separated from the trash to be burned.  The garbage was then placed into tanks and cooked.  Next the garbage was sent to dryers. 

    •After drying, the was “ground.”  After grinding, it went to the Naphtha plant to extract the grease.  The grease was shipped to Proctor and Gamble to make soap and other products.  The remaining material was ground again and placed into sacks to be sold as fertilizer.  The fertilizer that could not be sold was given to local farmers. 

     

                The plant operated from 1910 to 1936.  It closed April 1st of that year, when a similar operation was opened in Pittsburgh.  An article written in the 1920’s about Reduction listed the annual volume of business at more than $ 300,000 (a 58 million dollar industry in today’s economy, according to the CPI Index).

Please signup or login to answer this question.

Sorry,At this time user registration is disabled. We will open registration soon!