What is your favorite poem about the environment?

5

Answers


  1. 0 Votes

    “Planet Earth” by Michael Jackson (poem)

    Planet Earth, my home, my place
    A capricious anomaly in the sea of space
    Planet Earth are you just
    Floating by, a cloud of dust
    A minor globe, about to bust
    A piece of metal bound to rust
    A speck of matter in a mindless void
    A lonely spacship, a large asteroid
    Cold as a rock without a hue
    Held together with a bit of glue
    Something tells me this isn’t true
    You are my swweetheart soft and blue
    Do you care, have you a part
    In the deepest emotions of my own heart
    Tender with breezes caressing and whole
    Alive with music, haunting my soul.
    In my veins I’ve felt the mystery
    Of corridors of time, books of hisotry
    Life songs of ages throbbing in my blood
    Have danced the rhythm of the tide and flood
    Your misty clouds, your electric storm
    Were turbulent tempests in my own form
    I’ve licked the salt, the bitter, the sweet
    Of every encounter, of passion, of heat
    Your riotous color, your fragrance, your taste
    Have thrilled my senses beyond all haste
    In your beuaty, I’ve known the how
    Of timeless bliss, this moment of now
    Planet Earth are you just
    Floating by, a cloud of dust
    A minor globe, about to bust
    A piece of metal bound to rust
    A speck of matter in a mindless void
    A lonely spacship, a large asteroid
    Cold as a rock without a hue
    Held together with a bit of glue
    Something tells me this isn’t true
    You are my swweetheart gentle and blue
    Do you care, have you a part
    In the deepest emotions of my own heart
    Tender with breezes caressing and whole
    Alive with music, haunting my soul.
    Planet Earth, gentle and blue
    With all my heart, I love you.

  2. 0 Votes

    Poem on Pollution by Qirui Soh

    The sea was still,

    the water a halcyon piece of glass.

    Until the human emerged from it, 

    and shattered the silence.

     

    The soil a concrete block,

    dampened and compact.

    Until the human trampled the soil,

    and pounded the clay.

     

    The grass stood robust,

    its green armor glowing in the sun.

    Until the human, when learning to run,

    ripped the grass right out of its roots.

    The trees were statuesque,

    majestic, decorated warriors of old.

    Until the human needed shelter,

    and hacked the tree from ear to ear.

     

    The wildlife used to thrive,

    the jungle a kingdom to behold.

    Until the human needed land to grow his food, 

    and scorched the forest alive.

     

    The marine life was bustling,

    the fish free to swim to any corner of the world.

    Until the human needed a place to dump his waste,

    and smothered the oceans with black poison.

     

    The sky was abundant,

    like a shield, an aegis suit of armor in the air.

    Until the human needed transport and built the car,

    suffocating the clouds until they choked, 

    constricting the sky until it broke.

     

    The arctic mammals lived in peace,

    resting and feeding on the ice.

    Until the human made it warm,

    the mammals now drown and sink in water.

     

    From the sea came the tidal wave and crushed some of them,

    from the soil came the earthquake and demolished some of them,

    from the grass came the barren droughts and starved some of them,

    from the trees came the carbon dioxide and suffocated some of them,

    from the forest came the forest fires and burnt some of them,

    from the seas came the flooding and drowned some of them,

    from the skies came the thunderstorm and struck some of them,

    from the ice came the blizzard and killed froze some of them,

    and from the humans came the humans and eradicated all of them.

     

  3. 0 Votes

    I’m a big fan of “When I heard the Learned Astronomer” by Walt Whitman.

    When I heard the learn’d astronomer;  
    When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me;  
    When I was shown the charts and the diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them;  
    When I, sitting, heard the astronomer, where he lectured with much applause in the lecture-room,  
    How soon, unaccountable, I became tired and sick;          5
    Till rising and gliding out, I wander’d off by myself,  
    In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time,  
    Look’d up in perfect silence at the stars.
  4. 0 Votes

     

    Lost

    Stand still. The trees ahead and bushes beside you
    Are not lost. Wherever you are is called Here,
    And you must treat it as a powerful stranger,
    Must ask permission to know it and be known.
    The forest breathes. Listen. It answers,
    I have made this place around you,
    If you leave it you may come back again, saying Here.
    No two trees are the same to Raven.
    No two branches are the same to Wren.
    If what a tree or a bush does is lost on you,
    You are surely lost. Stand still. The forest knows
    Where you are. You must let it find you.

    David Wagoner

  5. 0 Votes

    A well known poem by Robert Frost that takes place in the woods; but that I take as a metaphor for one’s choices in life and the feeling of standing at the crossroads of different paths (metaphorical or otherwise)

    “The Road Not Taken”   

    by Robert Frost

    Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
    And sorry I could not travel both
    And be one traveler, long I stood
    And looked down one as far as I could
    To where it bent in the undergrowth;
     
    Then took the other, as just as fair,
    And having perhaps the better claim,
    Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
    Though as for that the passing there
    Had worn them really about the same,
     
    And both that morning equally lay
    In leaves no step had trodden black.
    Oh, I kept the first for another day!
    Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
    I doubted if I should ever come back.
     
    I shall be telling this with a sigh
    Somewhere ages and ages hence:
    Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
    I took the one less traveled by,
    And that has made all the difference.
     
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