what is the process involved in the formation and destruction of marble?

2

Answers


  1. 0 Votes

    Of marble? Jeeze. Are you planning to corner the market or something?

    First, the basics: What is marble? In a strict sense marble is more or less crystalized limestone (I had someone lecture me about this). However, because marble has pattern suggested by other rocks, one definition that we will dispose of for the discussion is “anything that looks like marble”. As the OED points out, there are many varieties of limestone marble.

    Now we head over to Wikipedia, where the some editors, for reasons possibly only known to themselves, have redefined marble to be “non-foliated metamorphic rock”. Since they have ignored the Merriam-Webster and OED definition, but not given any reference for their own, they need to get their act in gear. Big sigh. They do add something useful to the conversation by pointing out that the Dictionary of Geology says geologists mean “marble” to mean metamorhosed limestone, while stonemasons use the term more generally to include unmatamorphosed limestone.

    With me so far?

    Marble is a limestone. Limestone is a sedimentary rock. And sedimentary rocks are formed by “the deposition of material at the Earth’s surface and within bodies of water”. I.e., they don’t come from volcanic processes.

    Finally we get to the not-too-easy-to-read Wikipedia article on … limestone! And finally we learn something we actually care about pertaining to the question:

    Limestone is partially soluble, especially in acid.

    Ah-ha! Then we have:

    Caves develope in limestone rocks tue to their solubility in dilute acidic groundwater.

    So now we know that marble is destroyed by acids. That, of course is the reason that pollution such as acid raid is so disastrous for 

    • 0 Votes

      Unfortunately, GreenAnswers stopped me from completing my edit, so the above should read:

      Of marble? Jeeze. Are you planning to corner the market or something?

      First, the basics: What is marble? In a strict sense marble is more or less crystalized limestone. I had someone lecture me about this. However, because marble has patterns that look like other rocks too, one definition that we will dispose of for the discussion is “anything that looks like marble”. As the OED points out, there are many varieties of limestone marble.

      Now we head over to Wikipedia, where some idiot editors have redefined marble to be “non-foliated metamorphic rock”. Since they have ignored the Merriam-Webster and OED definition, but not given any reference for their own, they need to get their act in gear. Sigh. Bad, bad, bad. They do add something useful to the conversation by pointing out that the Dictionary of Geology says geologists mean “marble” to mean metamorhosed limestone, while stonemasons use the term more broadly and generally to include unmetamorphosed limestone.

      With me so far? We’re almost done with the hard stuff. (So to speak.)

      Marble is a limestone. Limestone is a sedimentary rock. And sedimentary rocks are formed, according to the Wikipedia article Limestone, by:

      The deposition of material at the Earth’s surface and within bodies of water

      I.e., limestones don’t come from volcanic processes.

      According to that Wikipedia article:

      Many limestones are formed from fragments of marine organisms

      Also according to that not-very-easy-to-read article:

      Limestone is partially soluble, especially in acid

      Ah-ha! Then we have:

      Caves develop in limestone rocks due to their solubility in dilute acidic groundwater.

      So now we know that marble is destroyed by acids. That, of course, is the reason that pollution such as acid raid is so disastrous for outside statues, tombstones, the Acropolis, etc. Limestone buildings that lasted for thousands of years are now being destroyed because the planet has become severely polluted.

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