What are some methods of preventing desertification?

7

Answers


  1. 0 Votes

    Trees are a good strategy to prevent desertification.  Wind can lead to erosion of top soil, and trees can help block the wind.  Rotational grazing is another good way; overgrazing can lead to desertification, and rotational grazing allows for plant life to grow back.

  2. 0 Votes

    Planting trees and trying different farming methods are a couple ways. Land management and promoting sustainable uses of resources are proving to be crucial in preventing desertification. Many organizations and conservation groups are actively making their mark and putting forth multiple efforts in hopes of avoiding mass deteriration of land through education and implementation strategies.

  3. 0 Votes

    There are several methods that have been attempted to prevent desertification. Reducing the number of animals grazing on affected lands and allowing plants to re-grow is one possible step. Covering the soil with a layer of leaves and sawdust reduces the rate of evaporation, inhibits growth of weeds, and also enriches the soil. Covering sand dunes with large boulders will help interrupt the wind and prevent the sand from moving. 

  4. 0 Votes

    In locations that have been degraded and could be susceptible to desertification, either from over grazing, land development, or any other reason, active restoration of the site is a great way humans can help prevent decertifications. Restoration Ecology is the scientific study of returning a damaged, degraded, pr destroyed ecosystem back to its natural state. Some techniques associated with this study are the removal of invasive species, re-vegetation of native species and returning to natural ecosystem processes which favor native plant growth. For example, seasonal fires in prairie ecosystems prevents woody plants from taking over and return nutrients to the soil without harming the roots, favoring the growth of native plants and grasses. 

  5. 0 Votes

    A few methods include: 

    Sahel Re-­‐Greening Initiative: The SRI is currently being developed by national and international NGOs and research institutions. They will cooperate closely with relevant ministries such as those for agriculture and the environment in various Sahelian countries (at present Burkina Faso, Mali, the Niger and Senegal). In each participating country, a national alliance of NGOs and other partners has been created.

    Forest Investment Program: A program within the Strategic Climate Fund (a multi-­‐donor Trust Fund within the Climate Investment Funds), FIP’s overall objective is to mobilize increased funds to reduce deforestation and forest degradation and to promote sustainable forest management, leading to emission reductions and the protection of carbon terrestrial sinks. Forest Investment Program: A program within the Strategic Climate Fund (a multi-­‐donor Trust Fund within the Climate Investment Funds), FIP’s overall objective is to mobilize increased funds to reduce deforestation and forest degradation and to promote sustainable forest management, leading to emission reductions and the protection of carbon terrestrial sinks.

    Green Wall for the Sahara Initiative: Proposed by African Heads of State, the initiative has become part of the strategic cooperation between the African Union and the European Union.

    Environmentalism by decree: Niger’s new government renamed Independence Day, Aug. 3, Arbor Day and ordered every citizen to plant a tree on the anniversary.

    Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration: FMNR is a reforestation technique practiced in Niger, Chad, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia and Mali. Since the middle of the 1980s farmers in the most densely populated parts of Niger have begun to protect and manage young trees and bushes regenerating on their cultivated fields. FMNR was initially developed and promoted on a small scale in Niger in 1983, and was scaled up during the famine of 1984. Through a food-­‐for-­‐work program, FMNR was promoted in over 100 villages by staff of SIMs (Serving in Mission, an inter-­‐denominational Protestant mission) Maradi Integrated Development Project. Farmers had traditionally cleared their land of all woody and herbaceous vegetation in preparation for planting annual crops. Despite this, the remaining rootstock of the native trees continued to re-­‐sprout each year. Farmers practicing FMNR trained these plants, and grew them into trees of between 3–6 meters in height. These farmers saw increases in crop yields, increased fodder production, fuel wood availability from prunings and thinnings, as well as the potential to sell firewood in drought years. FMNR covers at least 5 million acres in Niger; farmers have added each year during a period of 20 years an average 68,000 acres. This has never been achieved by any tree planting project in Africa. 

    Community-Based Forest Management: In Latin America forest tenure reforms and the recognition of Indigenous Peoples’ territories and native lands has shifted forest land ownership signiIicantly, and the state now only owns or administers 36.1 percent of forest land. There has been less shift in Asia; 67.8 percent of forest lands are state owned and administered. In Africa, 97.9 percent of the forest remains under state ownership and administration. 

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  6. 0 Votes

    Have government implement and enforce methods that promote sustainable practices in these areas. For instance, they could tell farmers to try new farming methods. Or they could give incentive to people or farmers to plant more trees.

  7. 0 Votes

    Reduce or entirely stop mowing… to prevent mower destruction of sapling trees

    as well as needed other plants… and to stop the destruction of ground nesting

    birds, toads and other reptiles, insects etc.

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