How many pounds of iron ore is used to make one metal spoon

1

Answers


  1. 0 Votes

    Ummm.  Why does this question get asked so much? Is it a school assignment? If it is an assignment, then read the teacher’s suggested material, or ask them for clarification. Either way will get you an answer.

    If this is not a school assignment then a couple things needed to be considered.

    1) The typical yield of commercial iron ore. Your partial answer is in the citation, below. Note that in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, one iron ore called Taconite was only 25% to 30% iron. It was considered uneconomical to mine. Now, in the United States, all the good iron ore is “mined out”, so they mine stuff like Taconite that was before considered junk.

    2) I just weighed some spoons. The teaspoons are about 1/16 of a pound, and the soup spoons aren’t much more than that. Of that, of course, not all is iron! Good quality steel includes other (more expensive) metals besides iron. But simplifying to assume the whole spoon is steel (processed iron, that is), then in the USA: 1 lb. of iron ore = 0.3 lbs iron.  0.3 lbs. of iron, at 1/16th pound per spoon makes … .3 lbs. divided by 1/16th (.06). So the answer is … ?

    (spoiler below)

    3) Spoons aren’t always made from metal, or even from iron. Ceramic spoons are a great alternative — since they add no taste to the food. Gold and silver spoons are made partly from gold and silver (duh), but there the ratio is not established. Silver and gold plated spoons are iron spoons with a thin layer of precious metal. But other silverware only includes as much iron as needed to make it stiff enough for use. Some silverware, therefore, includes no iron at all.

     

    .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    .

    Number of spoons from a typical pound of ore in the US?

    .

    .

    5

Please signup or login to answer this question.

Sorry,At this time user registration is disabled. We will open registration soon!