How many different species are there in the world?

4

Answers


  1. 0 Votes

    It is very hard to know, or even estimate precisely how many species there are in the world, although currently there are about 1.4 million species described.

    There could be an estimated 100 million species on earth! A low estimate is 2 million. The best estimate might be around 10 million. But even if that’s the case, it means we’ve only known about a small fraction of what is presently there.

    Many of the species that we’re discovering live in areas that are not often studied, such as species that live on tn the sea floor. The bacteria living in these parts use this energy like plants use the energy of the sun. They then form the base of a giant food web thousands of feet below the surface. Only until recently have we been able to discover this new habitat. Now scientists believe there could be as many as a million species just in on the ocean floor.

  2. 0 Votes

    Currently, scientists have named and successfully classified over 1.5 million species. It is estimated that there are as little as 5 million to as many as 30 million more species that have not yet been found and/or have been incorrectly classified. Estimates vary from scientist to scientist because it is close to impossible to truly know whether there are any more species living that are not by the tip of the scientists’ noses. As fields such as microbiology progress, scientists of taxonomy become more capable of accurately classifying species of the past and present.

  3. 0 Votes

    There are around 1,589,361 species on Earth. 59,811 are vertebrate animal species and 1,203,375 are invertebrate animal species. There are 297,326 plant species. There are 28,849 other species, which include lichens, mushrooms, and brown algae.

  4. 0 Votes

    According to the first website below, there are 1,589,361 species on Earth. It even breaks down the amount for say vertebrae, invertebrates, etc. Of course this number is false, because it is impossible for humans to know every single species on Earth when “new species” are being found every day. Also some species are going extinct as we speak, so really the tally of species is not correct, but merely just an estimation based on the data we have today.

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