How is Iowa’s ruling on wolf hunting going to effect other states with wolf populations?

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    I’m actually not entirely sure you mean Iowa, as the most recent news of interest regarding wolves and hunting is actually out of Montana and Idaho (http://www.defenders.org/newsroom/press_releases_folder/2009/09_09_2009_wolf_hunt_will_continue_while_court_hears_lawsuit.php). Recently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service delisted wolves from the endangered species list, and although the federal court stated that this was a premature measure (and the wolves are, in fact, still endangered), that hunting could still proceed.

    Despite the ruling, Defenders of Wildlife are optimistic about a return to endangered status for the wolves. Apparently, despite the continued ability of hunters to take wolves, hunting will only be allowed of up to 20% of the wolf population, which will have no long term effect on the status of the wolves (1,350 individuals remain). Once wolves are returned to endangered status (which they will be since F&WS was found in violation of the ESA), then hunting will again become illegal.

    Hopefully that answers your question. Like I said, I cannot find any pertinent information in regards to the legalities of wolf hunting in Iowa.

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