How do climate deniers back up their argument?

4

Answers


  1. 0 Votes

     

    It is very important to understand both sides to any argument. Amongst several arguments, one of the most popular and ligitamate is that the world is always changing. When looking at factual evidence of climate changes throughout thousands and thousands of years one will find that there are always temporary ups and downs like the waves of an ocean. To put it in a sports perspective, it is much like a baseball player who has been slumping for an entire year. Sure most people will dismiss him and say that he is on a downward spiral and his career is over, but that is not exactly the case. There is no knowing if he can turn it around the next year or within the next month. Maybe he never will, but just because he had an off year does not mean there is reason for immediate concern. 
    There are hard facts that can tell you exact measurements and comparisons of climate throughout the years, but it can make a world of a difference how you chose to interpret the facts. If looking at comparisons of climate change from the past few decades to today it will seem like a monumental change, yet when looking over the past few millennia you will see that it always balances itself out in the long run and that the changes are natural. The earth has been around for many millennia and will continue to do so much in the same way as it always has.

    It is very important to understand both sides to any argument. Amongst several arguments, one of the most popular and ligitamate is that the world is always changing. When looking at factual evidence of climate changes throughout thousands and thousands of years one will find that there are always temporary ups and downs like the waves of an ocean. To put it in a sports perspective, it is much like a baseball player who has been slumping for an entire year. Sure most people will dismiss him and say that he is on a downward spiral and his career is over, but that is not exactly the case. There is no knowing if he can turn it around the next year or within the next month. Maybe he never will, but just because he had an off year does not mean there is reason for immediate concern. 

    There are hard facts that can tell you exact measurements and comparisons of climate throughout the years, but it can make a world of a difference how you chose to interpret the facts. If looking at comparisons of climate change from the past few decades to today it will seem like a monumental change, yet when looking over the past few millennia you will see that it always balances itself out in the long run and that the changes are natural. The earth has been around for many millennia and will continue to do so much in the same way as it always has.

     

    • 0 Votes

      (My browser messes up the display of codyurb’s answer, here is again.)

      It is very important to understand both sides to any argument. Amongst several arguments, one of the most popular and legitimate is that the world is always changing. When looking at factual evidence of climate changes throughout thousands and thousands of years one will find that there are always temporary ups and downs like the waves of an ocean. To put it in a sports perspective, it is much like a baseball player who has been slumping for an entire year. Sure most people will dismiss him and say that he is on a downward spiral and his career is over, but that is not exactly the case. There is no knowing if he can turn it around the next year or within the next month. Maybe he never will, but just because he had an off year does not mean there is reason for immediate concern.

      There are hard facts that can tell you exact measurements and comparisons throughout the years, but it can make a world of difference how you chose to interpret the facts. If looking at comparisons of climate change from the past few decades to today it will seem like a monumental change, yet when looking over the past few millennia you will see that it always balances itself out in the long run and that the changes are natural. The earth has been around for many millennia and will continue to do so much in the same way as it always has.

  2. 0 Votes

    I have heard the argument that global warming is “impossible” because of the huge amounts of snow that we got across the U.S. last year and that we still have seasons so it can’t be that bad. 

    I think the problem is that people only think of global warming, not climate change as a whole; there is a big difference. 

    Global warming is an increase in global surface temperature due to greenhouse gases created by humans. Climate change includes not just changes in temperature, but also precipitation and sea levels which actually have a greater impact. 

    What most do not realize is that things like huge snow storms, excessive massive tornadoes and dramatic droughts and rainy seasons are quite possibly being caused by global warming, thus creating climate change.

    Like codyurb said, many also argue that the planet goes through climate periods. This is true, but it is undeniable that our current rising temperatures and dramatic weather situations are being added to by human waste, even if it is in addition to a weather pattern.  

  3. 0 Votes

    Let me put forward something that in the battle lines of international debate is rarely talked about, but really should be the focus of discussion: If Global Warming is natural, or if it’s not, should we do something about it? That is, should we try to find a way to make the weather milder? I’m not quite sure, but I think the answer is yes.

    Whatever the reason for the changes, the changes aren’t good. It was thought a few years ago that as climate changes plants and animals would naturally move to areas nearby for which they are better suited. It’s now being observed that the majority of plants and animals can’t move that fast. Example: redwoods take 100s of years to grow, so if their natural range moves completely in the next 100 years, all of the old ones will die, and only ones <100 years old will remain. In other cases the natural habitat is vanishing, and not being replaced by anything. For example, the northern ice at the pole which the Polar Bears rely on is becoming so thin, the bears are constantly falling through. They are moving south, but that’s not the same environment, they are not well-suited to it, they are endangered, and there’s now an expectation they will go extinct in the wild.

    That could theoretically be stopped, if we artificially reversed the warming trend. Whether that would work is open to question. But there doesn’t seem to be any question that we should develop methods so that we at least have the option.

Please signup or login to answer this question.

Sorry,At this time user registration is disabled. We will open registration soon!