can zoos, hatcheries,seed banks and botanical gardens harbour enough specimens to provide the genetic diversity their species need to survive until yhey can be reestablished in the wild? how?

how and why?
can all these facilities (zoos,hatcheries, botanic gardens, seed banks) habour enough specimens to provide the genetic diversity their specie need to survive until they can be reestablished in the wild?

2

Answers


  1. 0 Votes

    It is possible in some cases, yes. But one must consider what made these specimens scarce in the first place… was it pollution? Deforestation? Over-use of natural resources? How do we know that if we take the time and care to place endangered species back in the wild that they will remain there long enough to make a difference? 

    This is a good question, but not one with a simple solution. It is not as easy to fix what we have broken down. There were certain changes and actions that made these specimens rare, and if we want to help bring them back we need to address the bigger issues that happened to cause that.

    • 0 Votes

      One of the possibilities for zoos ,hatcheries, seed banks botanical gardens and similar ex situ species sanctuaries to habour enough specimens to provide the genetic diversity their species need to survive until they can be reestablished in the wild is MEIOSIS.
      Genetic variation plays the role of a raw material for natural selection. Some individuals who are favored by natural selection have greater fitness than others because of their alleles (pair of alternative forms of gene). In case of animals, males that are unable to compete for mates, for example, succumb to predation or disease or fail to reproduce; small and weak organisms don’t survive for long time. These are the best examples of natural selection. You can also take an example of a disease to which some individuals will be at least partially resistant while others are susceptible to it.
      Populations can adapt to changes in the environment as a result of the genetic variation resulting from meiosis. However, in clonal asexual populations, organisms are not able to adapt to changes without mutations. Organisms which adapt to changes in the environment, survive, while others get eliminated by natural selection. In this way, a population contains fit individuals and the process continues for generations together. The diversity afforded by meiosis is beneficial for the population as a whole.

      Thus, meiosis helps to create a population that is not only physically and genetically different but also one, which is perfectly fit to survive.

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