Can a maggot that wiil grow to become a male fly be differentiated from that that will give rise to a female fly?

If true, how

2

Answers


  1. 0 Votes

    Just by looking at it? Probably not.  However, there has been a study that does suggest sexual dimorphism (a difference between male and female) in the rate of maturation of certain fly larvae.  According to this article, (http://ddr.nal.usda.gov/bitstream/10113/23106/1/IND90062722.pdf), almost all of the female larvae (maggots) had reached maturity in two days, while only half of the males were mature. 

    So, if you have a bunch of maggots that all appeared at the same time, it’s likely that the first ones to turn into flies will be female, and that one maggot that’s still hanging out after 3 days is probably a male.

  2. 0 Votes

    Just by looking at it? Probably not.  However, there has been a study that does suggest sexual dimorphism (a difference between male and female) in the rate of maturation of certain fly larvae.  According to this article, (http://ddr.nal.usda.gov/bitstream/10113/23106/1/IND90062722.pdf), almost all of the female larvae (maggots) had reached maturity in two days, while only half of the males were mature. 

    So, if you have a bunch of maggots that all appeared at the same time, it’s likely that the first ones to turn into flies will be female, and that one maggot that’s still hanging out after 3 days is probably a male.

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