Are there any fish that don’t have mercury in them?

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    Unfortunately, probably not. The contamination is the water and because all fish live in the water, they are all likely to have some contamination. A federal study was done between 1998 and 2005, testing over 1000 fish from over 281 different stream and every single one tested positive.

    Mercury Diagram

     

    However, you can limit your risk by eating fish with low mercury ratings. This list is directly copied from the Natural Resources Defense Council. Some fish are not recommended for eating due to overfishing or the way that they are farmed. There are other contaminations to worry about such as PCB, which is a contaminant often found in farmed salmon. The information below was compiled from data recorded by the FDA and EDA.

    “Protecting yourself — and the fish: Certain fish, even some that are low in mercury, make poor choices for other reasons, most often because they have been fished so extensively that their numbers are perilously low. These fish are marked with an asterisk (read more below).

    This list applies to fish caught and sold commercially. For information about fish you catch yourself, check for  advisories in your state.

    LEAST MERCURY
    Enjoy these fish:
    Anchovies
    Butterfish
    Catfish
    Clam
    Crab (Domestic)
    Crawfish/Crayfish
    Croaker (Atlantic)
    Flounder*
    Haddock (Atlantic)*
    Hake
    Herring
    Mackerel (N. Atlantic, Chub)
    Mullet
    Oyster
    Perch (Ocean)
    Plaice
    Pollock
    Salmon (Canned)**
    Salmon (Fresh)**
    Sardine
    Scallop*
    Shad (American)
    Shrimp*
    Sole (Pacific)
    Squid (Calamari)
    Tilapia
    Trout (Freshwater)
    Whitefish
    Whiting

    MODERATE MERCURY
    Eat six servings or less per month:
    Bass (Striped, Black)
    Carp
    Cod (Alaskan)*
    Croaker (White Pacific)
    Halibut (Atlantic)*
    Halibut (Pacific)
    Jacksmelt
    (Silverside)
    Lobster
    Mahi Mahi
    Monkfish*
    Perch (Freshwater)
    Sablefish
    Skate*
    Snapper*
    Tuna (Canned
    chunk light)
    Tuna (Skipjack)*
    Weakfish (Sea Trout)

    HIGH MERCURY
    Eat three servings or less per month:
    Bluefish
    Grouper*
    Mackerel (Spanish, Gulf)
    Sea Bass (Chilean)*
    Tuna (Canned Albacore)
    Tuna (Yellowfin)*

    HIGHEST MERCURY
    Avoid eating:
    Mackerel (King)
    Marlin*
    Orange Roughy*
    Shark*
    Swordfish*
    Tilefish*
    Tuna
    (Bigeye, Ahi)*

    * Fish in Trouble! These fish are perilously low in numbers or are caught using environmentally destructive methods. To learn more, see the Monterey Bay AquariumBlue Ocean Institute, both of which provide guides to fish to enjoy or avoid on the basis of environmental factors. and the

    ** Farmed Salmon may contain PCB’s, chemicals with serious long-term health effects.

    Sources for NRDC’s guide: The data for this guide to mercury in fish comes from two federal agencies: the Food and Drug Administration, which tests fish for mercury, and the Environmental Protection Agency, which determines mercury levels that it considers safe for women of childbearing age.

    About the mercury-level categories: The categories on the list (least mercury to highest mercury) are determined according to the following mercury levels in the flesh of tested fish.

    • Least mercury: Less than 0.09 parts per million
    • Moderate mercury: From 0.09 to 0.29 parts per million
    • High mercury: From 0.3 to 0.49 parts per million
    • Highest mercury: More than .5 parts per million”

    http://www.nrdc.org/health/effects/mercury/guide.asp

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