Protect Rare Predator from Extinction

Target: Michael Finley, Chair of the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission

Goal: Protect rare predator from extinction at the hands of habitat destruction.

A rare predator in Oregon may soon face extinction. Less than 200 Humboldt martens exist in the state of Oregon. Join conservationists in demanding the state add the species to its endangered species list.

The rare Humboldt marten is a small, cat-like mammal. It resides in the state’s coastal forests. However, its numbers have declined, faced with logging, habitat destruction, and trapping by hunters.

Only one death of this species per year could lead to under-population and extinction within the next generation or two. Something must be done now to protect this rare animal before the predator becomes the prey.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Mr. Finley,

The Humboldt marten may be a predator, but it’s been given less than a fighting chance in your state. Less than 200 of the tiny mammals survive, most killed  by habitat destruction and trapping.

The Humboldt marten is facing rapid extinction. Just one death per year can wipe out the population completely within a generation or two. I ask that you add the species to your state’s endangered species list immediately.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Cody Connor

Save the Endangered Pacific Marten from Extinction

Target: Greg Sheehan, Principal Deputy Director of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Goal: Place Pacific marten back on endangered species list to ensure survival.

Studies warn that Pacific martens in Oregon could face extinction within the next few decades if conservation efforts aren’t made. Found in remote forest habitats in coastal Oregon and Northern California, marten populations have been sparse across the board ever since they reemerged in 1996. Numbers have drastically dwindled due to trapping, roadside fatalities, and habitat destruction. In 2015, conservationists petitioned to put the species back on the endangered species list, but the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service deemed it ¨unwarranted.¨ This is what needs to change.

Ongoing research at the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station led by Katie Moriarty shows that there’s one community around the Oregon Dunes that’s especially vulnerable to extermination. What she discovered were restrictive living spaces for martens to inhabit with the nearby Highway 101 serving as a barricade. Considering that Pacific martens were considered extinct for 50 years, they deserve our utmost protection. The first step to saving them involves guaranteeing federal recognition of their endangered status. Take action by signing the petition.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Director Sheehan,

Reports from the U.S. Forest Pacific Northwest Research Station in Oregon say a population of Pacific marten will soon perish if they aren’t properly cared for. Wildlife expert Katie Moriarty from the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Northwest Research Station is currently monitoring a richness (collective of martens) where only 71 adult martens remain in two small communities by the Umpqua River. One of the groups south of the river faces up to 99 percent risk of extinction according to the wildlife organization. All of this is due to habitat loss and human action.

Believed to have been extinct for 50 years, this rare species of marten only reappeared in 1996. Not having them federally classified as endangered seems ludicrous based on their legacy. Seeing that your committee expects to redetermine the Pacific marten’s status in October 2018, please understand that their survival depends on their inclusion into federal programs. Such classification will increase the likelihood of obtaining more lands for their future occupancy. Legal protections are essential for subpopulations around the Umpqua River to interact and reproduce at higher rates.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Oregon State University