Save Threatened Gray Wolves

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Target: Jon Jarvis, Director of U.S. National Park Service

Goal: Save a threatened wolf population from becoming locally extinct

The gray wolf population in Michigan’s Isle Royale National Park is quickly declining. Today, only nine remaining wolves can be found the in the vicinity – a shocking drop from a total of 24 just five years ago in 2009. This has become a major concern for many reasons. Without a sufficient number of wolves, for example, there is no mechanism for keeping moose populations in check; this means they are free to overgraze and overuse park lands.

Scientists have recently attributed this rapid decline to inbreeding. As a result of increasing land temperatures, the ice bridge that once connected Ontario and Isle Royale in the winter, no longer predictably forms. Thus, wolves from Canada cannot introduce new genes into the existing population. The limited genetic diversity is disastrous for the population – many new born pups have skeletal deformities or are extremely weak.

Without the introduction of a new gene pool to the area, the existing wolf population could eventually die out. Stop this from happening. Currently, the U.S. National Park Service has decided not to take immediate action to resolve this problem. Urge the agency to change its mind. We need to ensure the future of these wolves that play a vital role in maintaining the ecosystem.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Jon Jarvis, Director of U.S. National Park Service,

The rapid decline of the gray wolf population in Michigan’s Isle Royale National Park is a growing concern. In just five years, the number of remaining wolves has dropped drastically from 24 to 9. This could be disastrous for the delicate ecosystem. These wolves, for example, play a vital role in the maintenance of the moose populations in the park. Without a sufficient number of wolves, the park lands will be prone to overgrazing and over use.

Fortunately, this is entirely preventable. Since the current problem is largely caused by interbreeding, the simple introduction of a new population of wolves will help the species tremendously. As of now, the U.S. National Park Service has decided against taking immediate action to resolve the problem. However, by intervening, you can ensure a future for these wolves. This is a simple and feasible way to maintain the ecosystem. I urge you to reconsider your decision.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

Photo Credit: Retron via Wikipedia Commons

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